Mortgage FAQ’s

There is no question that getting a home mortgage is one of the more complicated hurdles in life. In order to make the best decisions, you should be educated. The following information will head you the right way when it comes to home loans.

Get a copy of your credit score before you apply for a mortgage. It is best to know where you stand before you complete an application for a mortgage. You should check your credit even if you are sure you have a good score since identity theft or mistakes can occur.

Before applying for a mortgage, pay down your debts. Lenders use a debt to income ratio to verify that you are able to afford a mortgage. A general rule of thumb is 36 percent of your gross income should be available to pay all of your monthly expenses, including your mortgage payment.

When you are waiting to close on your mortgage, don’t decide you want to take a shopping trip. Credit is often rechecked near the final approval, and if you’re spending too much, you may be denied. If you need to make any major purchases, wait until after you sign the closing paperwork.

Some creditors neglect to notify credit reporting companies that you have paid off a delinquent balance. Since your credit score can prevent you from obtaining a home mortgage, make sure all the information on your report is accurate. You may be able to improve your score by updating the information on your report.

When mortgage brokers are looking at your credit report, it is more beneficial to have low balances on several different accounts than it is to have a large balance on one or two credit cards. This is why it is essential to get your balances below fifty percent of a card’s limit before you apply for your mortgage. If you can get them under thirty percent, that’s even better.

Know that Good Faith estimates are not binding. These estimates are designed to give you a good idea of what your mortgage will cost. It should include title insurance, points, and appraisal fees. Although you can use this information to figure out a budget, lenders are not required to give you a mortgage based on that estimate.

Having a strong employment history will make it easier to qualify for a home mortgage. Lenders like to see that you have been at the same job for a good length of time. Barring that, they like to see continuous employment for at leas the past five or more years.

Remember, no home mortgage is “a lock” until you’ve closed on the home. A lot of things can affect your home mortgage up to that point, including a second check of your credit, a job loss, and other types of new information. Keep your finances in check between your loan approval and the close to make sure everything goes as planned.

If you have previously been a renter where maintenance was included in the rent, remember to include it in your budget calculations as a homeowner. A good rule of thumb is to dedicate one, two or even three perecent of the home’s market value annually towards maintenance. This should be enough to keep the home up over time.

Keep on top of your mortgage application by checking in with your loan manager at least once per week. It only takes one missing piece of paperwork to delay your approval and closing. There may also be last minute requests for more information that need to be provided. Don’t assume everything is fine if you don’t hear from your lender.

Be honest when it comes to reporting your financials to a potential lender. Chances are the truth will come out during their vetting process anyway, so it’s not worth wasting the time. And if your mortgage does go through anyway, you’ll be stuck with a home you really can’t afford. It’s a lose/lose either way.

Investigate preapprovals before you start home shopping. Preapproved mortgages will give you an idea of both how much home you can afford plus what your monthly mortgage payments will be. This will set the parameters of your home shopping and save you time not looking at properties you can’t realistically afford.

When shopping for a mortgage loan, ask if the rate is adjustable or fixed. Adjustable rate loans have interest rates which can vary greatly during the life of the mortgage. Also, your monthly payments will never be fixed and can increase by hundreds of dollars monthly. If the rate on the loan is adjustable, ask how and when the loan payment and rate could change.

Mortgages are a big topic to learn about. Since reading this article, you are more educated about the process. Use these tips to help you find a mortgage which exactly fits your needs.